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Mental illness, in all its various shapes, is a topic that is becoming more openly discussed today and with Fractured Minds, the message continues. Developed single-handedly by 17 year old Emily Mitchell, Fractured Minds delves into the dread and anguish that one with General Anxiety Disorder may experience in their daily lives. It’s a confronting tale, but it’s one that needs to be shared more often.

Good

  • 3D puzzle gameplay, making you examine objects in each given room and get to the next one.
  • Level layouts start out basic but get increasingly clever.
  • Confronting themes of anxiety and depression, drawing attention to important matters.
  • Unsettling atmospheres and clever use of lighting.
  • Words of discouragement, representing internal monologues of low self-esteem.
  • Moving music, atmospheric sounds and heavy breathing, adding to the game’s often unsettling yet thought-provoking nature.
  • Portion of the proceeds go to a video game mental health charity <3

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Bad

  • Overly simplistic gameplay
  • Puzzles lack complexity
  • Very short game (approximately 20-30 minutes)

Final Score: 80%

Despite its short runtime, Fractured Minds is a game that is sure to leave a lasting impression, whether you can relate to its powerful message or not. Its simplistic gameplay may be enough to deter some players, but it delivers on its promises with confronting honesty and proves that video games are powerful tools that can transcend basic entertainment.

Thank you for checking out our Fractured Minds Switch review (Quick) and thank you to our $5 and up Patreon Backer for their ongoing support:

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Posted by Alex Harding